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Democracy

Lessig on Legal Challenges to the Electoral College

Washington Journal

08/17/18

Professor Lawrence Lessig talked about a lawsuit he joined to challenge the Electoral College system. He spoke via video link from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The program was pre-empted by a four-minute pro forma session of the House of Representatives. This “Washington Journal” program continues after the session.

The Problem with Congress, and How to Fix It

The Atlantic, filmed at the Aspen Ideas Festival 2016

07/01/16

Lawrence Lessig is a Harvard Law professor and 2016 candidate for the Democratic nomination. In this interview filmed at the Aspen Ideas Festival , he explains how money’s influence in politics threatens American democracy. Congress has become deeply unrepresentative, he says, because politicians are focused on answering to their biggest campaign donors rather than the general population. This is why people are drawn to anti-establishment

Lessig on Campaign Finance

C-SPAN JCCSF Talk

01/08/15

Professor Lawrence Lessig talked about his proposals for a “New Hampshire rebellion against corruption” and for Congress to call a convention to address the influence of money in politics. In 2014, Professor Lessig formed a super political action committee (superPac) to fight congressional corruption in Congress and to change the U.S. campaign finance system. He’s the author of the book

Representative Jim Cooper Remarks on Congress

C-SPAN

01/27/11

Representative Jim Cooper (D-TN) spoke about partisan struggles and dysfunction over the course of several Congresses. Among the topics he addressed were redistricting, lobbying, congressional pay, and campaign fundraising. Following his remarks he answered questions from the audience.

Ethics in Politics

C-SPAN

01/21/11

Larry Lessig talked about the influence of corporate money in politics, public trust in government, and political reform movements. He also answered questions from the audience. This program was part of a conference focusing on the issue of money in politics and corporate power, and organized by a coalition of groups calling itself the “Movement for the People.”